Tag Archives: mixed-use

Imagining a City Built for Bicycles

A lot is made, and rightfully so, of the differences between walkable cities and auto-dependent cities, but isn’t there a middle way? Truly walkable cities, like most medieval walled cities and their small town USA descendents, aren’t really cities in the modern context. They can’t accommodate the scale and diversity we now associate with a city. Auto-dependent cities handle scale and diversity just fine, but they disconnect people from the built environment and each other. But what if we built our cities for bicycles? What would that look like? What benefits and drawbacks would this model have?
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Posted in architecture, Auto Independence, can bicycles save the world?, Culture, human scale, Josh Grigsby, Livability, Placemaking, transit, Transportation, Uncategorized, urban design, urban planning, walkable, What if? | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Interview: Traditional Home Builder Devin P. Rutkowski

The retention of vernacular architectural practices maintains a place’s connection to its past. It also informs the direction it charts into the future. I’m currently living in a small town in Florida—Sarasota—that has had its share of troubles during a growth process that has seen disparate vernacular styles such as Florida Cracker and the Sarasota School emerge, prosper, decline, and slowly reemerge. A new crop of craftsmen/builders are reviving traditional design, including Devin P. Rutkowski, founder and president of Bungalow Builders, LLC.
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Posted in architecture, Culture, History, Interview, Josh Grigsby, Local Inspiration, Placemaking, Sarasota, urban design, urban planning, vernacular architecture, What if? | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Mapping Future Growth

IF every acre of unprotected open space on Long Island were developed with single-family homes, the landscape could hold another 90,000 homes. On the other hand, if erected as town houses, garden apartments and apartment buildings, the same 90,000 units could be built in downtown areas, utilizing about half of the 8,300 acres — or 13 square miles — of available parking lots, vacant land or open space on the Island. How the area can grow, what it will take to be economically viable going forward, as well as how much and what type of new development is possible and preferable, is the focus of the 2010 Long Island Index released last week. The study and an accompanying interactive map (www.longislandindexmaps.org) examined 156 places, including 111 classified as downtowns.
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Posted in Culture, Livability, Placemaking | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Creating Car-Reduced and Car-Free Pedestrian Habitats

It will take a long time for the US to embrace pedestrians, bicycling, and electric carts as substitutes for cars in our communities. And yet an inevitable change is coming that will significantly increase environmental quality, and restore real community and economic viability. Changing legislation, master planning, and the development of car-reduced and car-free communities will move us forward, writes Greg Ramsey. Continue reading

Posted in Auto Independence, Culture, human scale, Livability, Placemaking, Shout Outs, Sustainability, transit, Transportation, walkable, What if? | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments