Tag Archives: Bill McKibben

Interview: Peter Sigrist and Katia Savchuk, co-founders of polis

I’ve mentioned before that though I didn’t discover polis until after beginning planologie, polis is in many ways a working model for what I hope planologie will become. Sitting down (virtually – we chatted online via Google WAVE) with Pete and Katia, the cofounders of polis, seemed logical for the first planologie interview.
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Posted in Interview, Josh Grigsby, Polis, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Reversal of Fortune

For most of human history, the two birds More and Better roosted on the same branch. You could toss one stone and hope to hit them both. That’s why the centuries since Adam Smith launched modern economics with his book The Wealth of Nations have been so single-mindedly devoted to the dogged pursuit of maximum economic production. Smith’s core ideas—that individuals pursuing their own interests in a market society end up making each other richer; and that increasing efficiency, usually by increasing scale, is the key to increasing wealth—have indisputably worked. They’ve produced more More than he could ever have imagined. They’ve built the unprecedented prosperity and ease that distinguish the lives of most of the people reading these words. It is no wonder and no accident that Smith’s ideas still dominate our politics, our outlook, even our personalities.
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Posted in Culture, History, human scale, Journalism, Livability, Sustainability, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Literary Theme Parks

The affront to our more cultivated sensibilities aside, are literary theme parks really signs of the apocalypse? Do they cheapen the written word or testify to its durability? Cormac McCarthy has said that he doesn’t think film adaptations of his books have any effect on the books themselves, that the books are the books and nothing can change them. Even with the thousands of professional and amateur adaptations and reinterpretations of A Christmas Carol, and even since the opening of Dickens World, the book itself remains a great read. Continue reading

Posted in Culture, Josh Grigsby, Rants, Response Pieces | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments